Wednesday, June 20, 2018

#WorldRefugeeDay #WithRefugees

Today is World Refugee Day. There is a message from the United Nations Secretary General here https://youtu.be/3hH3OoxPfO0 The partners on the USA's IMLS-funded Project Welcome: Libraries and Community Anchors Planning for Resettlement and Integration of Refugees and Asylum Seekers have been publicising their project including the World Refugee US Toolkit People are also encouraged to use the hashtags #WithRefugees and #WorldRefugeeDay to support the UNHCR’s #WithRefugees Campaign http://www.unhcr.org/refugeeday/
Some relevant articles and chapters for IL are:
- Lloyd, A. and Wilkinson, J. (2017). Tapping into the information landscape: Refugee youth enactment of information literacy in everyday spaces. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science. [early online publication] https://doi.org/10.1177/0961000617709058
- Fisher, K. (2018) Information Worlds of Refugees. In C. Maitland. (Ed). Digital Lifeline?: ICTs for Refugees and Displaced Persons.pp.79-112. MIT.
- Fenton, M.T. (2016) Come and Be Welcomed! An Exploration of Library Services to Immigrants and Refugees in the United States. Paper presented at: IFLA WLIC 2016 – Columbus, OH – Connections. Collaboration. Community in Session 101 - Poster Sessions. http://library.ifla.org/id/eprint/1528
Photo by Sheila Webber: waves, Norway, May 2018

Monday, June 18, 2018

New articles: web searching; discussion groups; collaborative information behaviour

The new issue of open-access journal Information Research (vol. 23, issue 2) has been published. It includes:
- Sara Salehi, Jia Tina Du and Helen Ashman: Use of Web search engines and personalisation in information searching for educational purposes
- Tali Gazit, Jenny Bronstein, Yair Amichai-Hamburger, Noa Aharony, Judit Bar-Ilan and Oren Perez: Active participants and lurkers in online discussion groups: an exploratory analysis of focus group interviews and observation.
- Jisue Lee and Ji Hei Kang: Crying mothers mobilise for a collective action: collaborative information behaviour in an online community
Go to: http://www.informationr.net/ir/23-2/infres232.html
Photo by Sheila Webber: the high point (literally in terms of height above sea level!) of the Oslo-Bergen rail line, May 2018

Friday, June 15, 2018

New Approaches to Liaison Librarianship

Another call for chapter proposals! This is for a book to be published by ACRL and edited by Robin Canuel (McGill University) and Chad Crichton (University of Toronto Scarborough). The title is New Approaches to Liaison Librarianship: Innovations in Instruction, Collections, Reference, and Outreach. "The editors aim to bring together a wide variety of perspectives from liaison librarians and liaison program leaders detailing the unique structures, practices, and solutions developed at their institutions. We feel that the time is ripe for a new in-depth treatment of liaison librarianship that details the responses of libraries to the latest trends in liaison librarianship and the recent literature discussing the liaison model in academic librarianship. We also hope to include a broad variety of perspectives, including those that may use different nomenclature ("subject librarians," "departmental librarians," and "embedded librarianship" are all relevant framings of practices and programs that we are interested in exploring)." Suggested chapter topics include "Instruction: The Benefits of Liaison Librarianship for Teaching and Learning" and "Faculty Research: Partnering with Faculty to Support their Scholarly Work". Proposals are due by September 14 2018. More information at: http://bit.ly/acrlliaison.
Photo by Sheila Webber: Vigeland Sculpture Park, Oslo.

Thursday, June 14, 2018

Older people and the digital

There was a breakfast meeting yesterday organised by the Centre for Ageing Better: Mind the Digital Gap. It was livestreamed and the recording is now at https://youtu.be/urGtmn_yOPg There were several speakers including Grandma Williams
They were also promoting a report published a couple of weeks ago: The digital age: new approaches to supporting people in later life get online
This draws in turn on a research report produced by them and by the Good Things Foundation: Richardson, J. (2017). I am connected: new approaches to supporting people in later life online
Both the reports can be downloaded from: https://www.ageing-better.org.uk/publications/digital-age
Photo by Sheila Webber: apple blossom, May 2018

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Recent articles: Human library; infolit of management science students

Just published (despite the 2017 date):
- Yap, J., Labangon, D. and Cajes, M. (2017) Defining, Understanding and Promoting Cultural Diversity Through the Human Library Program. Pakistan Journal of Information Management & Libraries (PJIM&L), 19, 1-12. http://journals.pu.edu.pk/journals/index.php/pjiml/article/view/1012 ("This case study documents the human library program [in the Philippines] as an alternative source of information which promotes cultural diversity to improve many facets of literacies which include media and information literacy. Human library aims to lessen our prejudices and makes us more tolerant individuals. In order to achieve cultural equality and social inclusivity, DLSU Libraries continues to offer human library sessions to form critical thinkers, lifelong learners and catalysts for social transformation. Most readers thought that the most important learning experience they gained while reading the books was to accept and understand each one of us as unique individuals. The human library program encourages people to be more tolerant and embolden acceptance."

- Rafique, G. and Khan, H. (2017). Skills Needed to Improve the Information Literacy of Pakistani Management Sciences’ Students. Pakistan Journal of Information Management & Libraries (PJIM&L), 19, 52-73. http://journals.pu.edu.pk/journals/index.php/pjiml/article/view/1014
Photo by Sheila Webber: Hawthorn and cherry blossom, May 2018

Tuesday, June 12, 2018

cfp Hidden Architectures of Information Literacy Programs

There is a call for chapters for a forthcoming ACRL book: Hidden Architectures of Information Literacy Programs: Structures, Practices, and Contexts. Chapter proposals are due on 1 August 2018. "Information literacy is a well-established goal of academic libraries, yet so much of the day-to-day work of running and coordinating information literacy programs is absent from professional literature, job descriptions, and library school coursework. While the definition of a program is a coordinated set of activities in service of a specific purpose, what those activities actually consist of - and who is responsible for them - is highly dependent on institutional and interpersonal contexts. ... This book will gather program examples to make visible the structures, practices, and contexts of information literacy programs in academic libraries. We are seeking chapters from academic librarians who identify as a leader of an information literacy program who want to share their experiences. Each case study chapter will detail definitions and missions, allocation of resources and labor, supervisory structures, prioritization approaches, and other processes and structures required to make programs work." Questions should be directed to hiddenarchitecturesbook@gmail.com and the full Call for Proposals, including a book chapter template are at http://bit.ly/HiddenArchitectBook
Photo by Sheila Webber: daffodils in Oslo, May 2018

Monday, June 11, 2018

cfp iConference 2019 inform include inspire #iconf19

There is a call for proposals for the 14th iConference, to be held in Washington, USA, March 31–April 3 2019. It is hosted by the University of Maryland, College Park in collaboration with Syracuse University and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. "Scholars, professionals, and researchers who share an interest in current critical information issues will celebrate the theme “inform. include. inspire.” We invite participants to discuss what it means to inform in the 21st century, to consider who is included in and excluded from the information revolution, and to question how we can best inspire individuals and organizations to use information for good in our rapidly-changing knowledge society. As we convene in the U.S. Capital, we will explore how we can inform, include, and inspire national and international policies and conversations related to technology." Options include papers, workshops, "sessions for interaction and engagement (SIE)", posters etc. , There is also a Doctoral Student Colloquium (DC) and Early Career Colloquium (ECC).
Submission opens on June 25 2018. Deadlines are: Papers, Workshops, Posters, DC, ECC: September 10, 2018; SIE, Blue Sky, Undergraduate Symposium, iSchools Partnerships and Practices, Doctoral Dissertation Award: October 1, 2018. Go to http://ischools.org/iconf2019 and https://ischools.org/the-iconference/call-for-participation/
Photo by Sheila Webber: lilac walk in Oslo, May 2018

Sunday, June 10, 2018

Transforming access to information for equity #nasig18 @walkyouhome

A couple of interesting presentations from Lauren Smith. One, presented today, is on Communities of praxis: transforming access to information for equity (a vision keynote at NASIG 2018) (embedded below)
A second, The impact of school libraries on educational outcomes: identifying the evidence base, was for the Scottish Library and information Council School Library Strategy National Advisory Group, presented in February 2018 https://www.slideshare.net/laurensmith/the-impact-of-school-libraries-on-educational-outcomes-identifying-the-evidence-base


Saturday, June 09, 2018

Critical reading - links and recording

On June 6 2018 there was an interesting webinar on critical reading in higher education (this was the ACRL instruction Section Annual Virtual Discussion Forum). The details (including some readings) are here https://acrl.ala.org/IS/2018-is-annual-virtual-discussion-forum-2/ Panelists were Anne Jumonville Graf, First Year Experience Librarian/Associate Professor, Trinity University, USA; Rosemary Green, Graduate Programs Librarian; Adjunct Professor, Conservatory Academics, Shenandoah University, USA and Stephanie Otis, Associate Dean for Public Services, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA. The recording of the video/audo part is here https://youtu.be/DjqJ9ySmBYQ and the chatlog here https://docs.google.com/document/d/1wkR4wdvhHN6HTFSA37lTLaa2pyvyscEpkXqhOO2yDxE/edit?usp=sharing
Some links mentioned during the session were:
- Hypothesis web annotation app https://web.hypothes.is/
- a book: Manarin, K. et al (2015) Critical Reading in Higher Education: Academic Goals and Social Engagement. http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/product_info.php?products_id=807689
- Acknowledging Doctoral Students’ Reading Experiences - abstract of a presentation by Rosemary Green with links to two handouts: the Metacognitive Assessment of Reading Strategies Inventory; and a Reading Activity https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/gradlibconf/2018/Day1/15/
- A written interview with Stephanie Otis about the presentation "Reading is Research" https://lib411.wordpress.com/2014/09/16/reading-is-research-an-interview/
- Red Light, Yellow Light for Truth: A routine focusing students on signs of puzzles of truth http://www.visiblethinkingpz.org/VisibleThinking_html_files/03_ThinkingRoutines/03f_TruthRoutines/RedLightYellowLight/RedLightYellowLight_Routine.html
Photo by Sheila Webber: cherry tree and shade, Oslo, May 2018

Friday, June 08, 2018

Multilingual Glossary for Today’s Library Users

Suggestions for new terms and volunteers to review language are invited for the Multilingual Glossary for Today’s Library Users, compiled by members of the Instruction for Diverse Populations Committee of the ACRL Instruction Section. The terms are given in English, French, Spanish, Vietnamese, Japanese, Korean, Chinese and Arabic. The aim was to assist English as a second-language (ESL) speakers and librarians working with them. The history of who has been involved is here. One obvious omission at the moment is the term "information literacy"! The glossary and definition of terms are linked to and explained here: https://acrl.ala.org/IS/instruction-tools-resources-2/pedagogy/multilingual-glossary-for-todays-library-users/
Photo by Sheila Webber: view of Bergen, May 2018

Thursday, June 07, 2018

Teens, Social Media & Technology 2018 @pewresearch

The Pew Research Center has releasesd a report (on May 31) about teenagers use of Social Media & Technology in the USA. Some snippets
- In terms of most used online platforms "roughly one-third say they visit Snapchat (35%) or YouTube (32%) most often" 15% say that Instagram is most visited and 10% Facebook
- Youtube is the used by the largest number (85% of respondents use it) (followed by Instagram, Snapchat and Facebook). I think the popularity of Youtube is also notable in studies by Ofcom of young people in the UK.
- "Girls are more likely than boys to say Snapchat is the site they use most often (42% vs. 29%), while boys are more inclined than girls to identify YouTube as their go-to platform (39% vs. 25%)".
- Facebook is more often most-used by lower income teens (22% vs 4% of higher income) and black teens (26% vs 7% white teens). White teens use Snapchat more.
- 45% "believe social media has a neither positive nor negative effect on people their age". "31% say social media has had a mostly positive impact, while 24% describe its effect as mostly negative." Various positive and negative aspects are listed. In negative, bullying is given as the most important reason.
- 95% of teens now say they have or have access to a smartphone. However access to a computer varies according to income and parents' level of education.
- 83% of girls play video games, and 97% of boys
The sample was: interviews with 1,058 parents of a teen aged 13 to 17 and interviews with 743 teens (conducted online and by telephone in March/ April 2018).
The full information is at http://www.pewinternet.org/2018/05/31/teens-social-media-technology-2018/
Photo by Sheila Webber: The Arcade, Second Life, June 2018

Wednesday, June 06, 2018

cfp Moving Toward the Future of Information Behaviour Research and Practice

There is a call for proposals for the ASIS&T SIG-USE Symposium: Moving Toward the Future of Information Behavior Research and Practice. SIG-USE is "concerned with people’s behavioral and cognitive activities as well as their affective states as they interact with information". This takes place on 10 November 2018 in Vancouver, Canada. The deadline for submissions is August 15 2018.
"We live in an era of change in terms of the technologies, platforms, and tools at our disposal. With these changes, we are also witnessing changes in communication practices, in the meaning and form of information, and in information behaviors. There has been a significant global shift in the ways that information and knowledge is produced, shared, and used. We have seen developments such as the crowdsourcing of knowledge work, the use of new communication channels in information diffusion activities, and the emergence of online environments serving as “third places” and “information grounds”. As we consider the future, there are many ways that we might consider information behavior research including users, application, contexts, and methods to study information behavior and practice."
They "invite poster (500 words or less) and short paper (2000 words or less) contributions that describe completed research and research-in-progress, and that showcase empirical, conceptual, theoretical, and methodological findings or rich practice cases and demonstrations, from researchers, graduate students, and practitioners."
(I wish I could go to this... am wondering about the feasibility of travelling to Vancouver for the weekend...) For more information go to: https://siguse.wordpress.com/2018/05/29/2018-asist-sig-use-symposium-cfp/
Photo by Sheila Webber: Between Bergen and Stavanger, May 2018